Welcome to BlogNotions' Finance Blog

The BlogNotions Finance Blog delivers a diverse series of perspectives provided by finance and accounting thought leaders. Presented by NetLine, this forum delivers compelling updates on the latest trends in the market, discussions of financial performance strategy, new ideas for communicating, raising capital, and controlling funds, and much more. Here you can find helpful information, ask questions, and collaborate freely.

Suffer In Silence. In Accounting Firms We Need More Talking.

Now is the time to take care of your talented CPAs. As usual, I am hearing some scary stories about the lack of communication inside accounting firms. In the summer months and into the fall, many firms are in the midst of performance evaluation/feedback sessions and salary increases. Notice I said “summer months and into […]

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The Victors Write the History Books, Even in Finance

“It ain’t what you don’t know that hurts you, it’s what you know that ain’t so.” (Attributed to Mark Twain, Will Rogers, Satchel Paige, Charles Farrar Browne, Josh Billings, and a number of others) A lot of what passes for investment knowledge is history-dependent, and may not serve us well in the future.  Further, a certain amount of […]

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Ranking P&C Reserving Conservatism

About 1 1/2 years ago, I wrote a .  It is still a good series, and worthy of your time, because there aren’t *that* many writers freely available on the topic. This particular article deals expands on , which deals with insurance reserving.  I wanted to do this at the time, but I was short […]

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Growing Your Firm – Growing Your Career

Jeremy Dillard, CPA recently presented on “Networking and Sales Best Practices” at the recent AICPA EDGE Conference in New Orleans. He offered some practical advice and his article was published this week via the AICPA. I wholeheartedly agree with his assessment about the many misconceptions CPAs have about networking, such as it should be tackled […]

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Are You Still Waiting To Be Paid For Work You Did in March?

Most of what I write about is based on real-life observation. This is one of those topics. New clients, at many CPA firms, are accepted without a very specific conversation about fees. It seems the CPA partners (the people responsible for those upfront conversations) are afraid. CPAs afraid? Yes, definitely. Afraid of scaring the prospective […]

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Good News Story – Give Your Next-Gen People A Voice

I was so pleased, when talking with the managing partner of one of my clients firms recently when he mentioned that since my visit last year they have accomplished so much. I have several clients like that. But, I have to be honest the majority of the accounting firms I work with and talk to […]

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The Tip Culture in Amateur Investing

A reader wrote to me and said: I’m sure a lot of people have already told you but I want to tell you anyway: Your blog is awesome! I came across The Aleph Blog a couple of months ago and I’m very impressed with your content. I particularly like that 4-part article on Using Investment […]

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The Tip Culture in Amateur Investing

A reader wrote to me and said: I’m sure a lot of people have already told you but I want to tell you anyway: Your blog is awesome! I came across The Aleph Blog a couple of months ago and I’m very impressed with your content. I particularly like that 4-part article on Using Investment […]

Continue Reading

The Problem with the Phillips Curve

I remember sitting in my intermediate macroeconomics class at Johns Hopkins, when the Professor was trying to develop the concept of the Phillips Curve, which posits a trade-off between labor unemployment and price inflation, at least in the short run.  The time was the Fall of 1980, and macroeconomics was trying to catch up with […]

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The Problem with the Phillips Curve

I remember sitting in my intermediate macroeconomics class at Johns Hopkins, when the Professor was trying to develop the concept of the Phillips Curve, which posits a trade-off between labor unemployment and price inflation, at least in the short run.  The time was the Fall of 1980, and macroeconomics was trying to catch up with […]

Continue Reading